Is your Diet making you FAT?

Well here we are, the second month into the new year and swiftly approaching the third already.

Can you believe it??

Before you know it, the daffodils will be popping up, the leaves on the trees will be sprouting again and everything will be turning greener and springing into life.

So here’s a question for you…How many of you have fallen off the diet wagon already?  Come on now, raise your hands….let’s see…1…2….3,4….5…….6….hmmm….thought so.  Don’t worry, my hand was partially up.  I haven’t been totally bad, but haven’t been totally good either.

I was reading an article over the weekend that talks about the diet mistakes we make and they’re making us fat instead of the other way around.  I admit to sort of doing the second one.  How many of these are you guilty of?

SKIPPING BREAKFAST

smily-breakfastSome think that not eating breakfast encourages your body to burn fat when in fact, thin people eat breakfast; fat people don’t.

Not eating breakfast leads to overeating later on as your blood sugar drops mid-morning, making you crave foods that aren’t healthy such as that double mocha and Danish.  Plus, you are more likely to binge at night as your body plays catch-up on missed calories, making you more likely to store the calories as fat.

So what should you do?  Any form of protein in the morning ~ plain yogurt with berries, an omelette, smoked salmon or sugar-free muesli with nuts ~ makes for a breakfast of kings, thin ones!  Can’t face having breakfast?  Eat a handful of walnuts or almonds about an hour after waking should be enough to stop you bingeing later.

WEEKEND BLOWOUT

nocakeIf you eat healthy all week, is it fine to treat yourself at weekends?  Even after 5 days of restraint, two days of freestyle carbicide will make you gain weight. (What’s carbicide?  Eating every bad carbohydrate within reach!)

Let’s say you eat and sensibly manage your carb intake during the week and then binge on lasagna, burgers, bread, cakes, ice cream, etc., over time, you could gain 10 lbs. or more.  Carbs are first stored as glucose and water, but will turn into fat if it isn’t worked off, so you’ll need to do extra exercise during the week.  Many people equate the weekend with being relaxed so therefore, they relax their eating habits.  If you feel compelled to overeat on the weekends, then it suggests the way you’re eating during the week isn’t satisfying you.

So what should you do?  Pepper your working week with small amounts of what you fancy, such as a small glass of wine, a piece of dark chocolate or a bite or two of cake.  If you end up having a big greasy breakfast on Saturday morning, make sure the rest of your meals for the day are healthy.  If you say to yourself ‘oh the damage has been done and I may as well continue for the weekend’, then you’ll gain back weight.  That’s how fat people think.

DIET DRINKS

Diet drinks have no calories so they won’t impact on your weight, right?  Wrong!  People who drink diet sodas are fatter than those who don’t.

Diet drinks feed a sweet tooth as, gram for gram, artificial sweeteners can be 13,000 times sweeter than sugar.  When your body receives a sweet taste without the expected calories, it triggers sweet cravings that make you eat more.  Sweeteners have also been shown to have a similar effect to real sugar on blood glucose and insulin levels.  One study found that a high intake of diet drinks could increase the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by 67%.

So what should you do?  Drink water or soda water with fresh lime or lemon or have some decaf or herbal tea or coffee.  If you want something sweet, coconut water with nothing added is a natural, healthy choice.

BUT IT’S HEALTHY!

Just because a food is healthy, doesn’t mean you can eat it in excess.

Hummus, pistachios and peanuts contain healthy fats but come will mega calories and often fail the ‘eat just one’ test.  Such foods can act as triggers for those with a tendency to overeat.  A food labeled ‘healthy’ doesn’t give you the option to just completely ignore calories.  Beware of cereals, snack bars and drinks that present themselves as healthy that are anything but.  Most people know that if sugar is listed in the first few ingredients, then it’s best to put it back on the shelf.  However, you do need to be aware of the sneaky ways that manufacturer’s list sugar on ingredients.

So what should you do?  No matter how healthy they are, don’t keep foods around that you find irresistible.  Things like raw almonds or Brazil nuts are a better choice than something like wasabi nuts.  If you find it difficult to have only 1-2 teaspoons of hummus with your veggies for a snack, then choose something else.  Avoid so-called healthy foods with ingredients such as corn syrup, maltose, dextrose, sucrose, fructose or any other word ending in ‘ose’.  Some foods produced by weight-loss programs can be high in sugar, artificial sweeteners and refined carbohydrates, which increase appetite.

FAT PHOBIA

OliveOilDon’t avoid fat if you want to lose weight.  Successful dieters get 30% of their daily calories from fat.

Studies show that the tiny 10% of people who lose weight and keep it off eat moderate amounts of good fats.  Fat is highly satiating and keeps you feeling fuller longer.  When dieters avoid fat, they are hungry all the time.  An obsession with low-fat products merely fuels a craving for fatty foods and that’s why they end up stuffing themselves with cakes and ice cream.  Low fat food is pointless because when the fat is removed, it is replaced with something else to retain taste and texture and that is usually sugar and flour, which provide calories but not very good nutrition.

Fat also provides essential vitamins A, D, E and K.  Unfortunately, we are now deficient in many of these thanks to the low-fat message, especially vitamin D, which is one of the reasons behind the re-emergence of rickets.

So what should you do?  Make sure you eat plenty of good fats, such as omega-3 fatty acids as there is evidence that these help the body burn fat.  Oily fish, coconut oil, walnuts and flax seeds are all good sources.  Put a small bit, about a 1/2 teaspoon of butter in your morning porridge or on your steamed veggies.  Try drizzling extra virgin olive oil on your veggies also as it gives them a nice added flavor.

HOW SUCCESSFUL DIETERS KEEP THE WEIGHT OFF

MaxineDiet90% of people who go on diets regain the weight within a year.  The US national Weight Control Registry studied the habits of the 10% of people who did keep off anything from 30 lbs. to 300 lbs. for five years or more.  Here’s what they did:

78% ate breakfast every day.  75% weighed themselves at least once a week.  62% watched less than 10 hours of TV a week.  90% exercised moderately for an hour every day (most chose walking).

IN CONCLUSION…

The only diets that have been proven effective for long-term weight loss in randomized controlled studies are those that focus on higher amounts of protein and vegetables, and limit carbohydrates to those with a low glycemic index (GI).  GI is a number rating out of 100 that refers to how quickly a particular food causes spikes in blood sugar.  Low GI is considered 55 or under.

Gives you some things to think about, eh?

  Terri  

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Apricot Oat Bars ~ South Beach Diet

Happy Friday Eve All!

SBDQECookbookAs you know from my post a few days ago, I’m back on the wagon…the proper eating wagon that is.  I have a couple of the SBD books (The original book, SBD Supercharged and the SBD Cookbook).  I decided to order a couple more so I got the SBD Good Carbs/Bad Carbs handbook and also The SBD Super Quick Cookbook.

I’ve only had the books a week and I’ve already made six recipes from the cookbook!  They all have been rather easy to put together and quite tasty also.  Tonight I’m making Lamb Meatballs in Tomato Mint Sauce which is another SBD recipe, but not from this cookbook.

I thought I would share the recipe I made early this morning.

These bars contain no flour at all and use rolled oats instead, so they are a Phase 2 food.  They are listed under the ‘breakfast’ section and make 12 bars, allowing for 1 bar per serving.  The recipe calls for peanut butter and dried apricots, but you can substitute another no-sugar-added nut butter, such as cashew and use dried cranberries or chopped dried apples or pears instead of the apricots.  It also calls for 1/4 cup granular sugar substitute (such as Splenda or Stevia) but I don’t have these in bulk, only in the small packets and didn’t feel like having to open who-knows-how-many so instead, used 3 tablespoons of agave nectar, which is allowed on Phase 2.  This comes out to less than one teaspoon per bar.

APRICOT OAT BARS

1/2 C natural creamy no-sugar-added peanut butter

1/4 C water

1 tsp vanilla extract

3 large egg whites (about 6 tablespoons)

1/4 C granular sugar substitute or 3 Tbsp agave nectar

2/3 C dried apricots, coarsely chopped

1/2 C walnuts, coarsely chopped

2 C rolled oats (not instant)

1/4 tsp salt

Heat the oven to 180°C/350°F.  Line a 9″x9″ (23cmX23cm) baking pan with parchment, leaving a 2inch (5cm) overhang on 2 sides.

In a large bowl, whisk together the peanut butter, water and vanilla.

Add the egg whites and whisk again.

Add the remaining ingredients until combined.  Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan and pat with moistened hands until even.

Bake for 15 minutes until crisp and set.

Cool in the pan for 5 minutes, the using the overhang, lift out of the pan.

Cut immediately into 12 bars.

Apricot Oat Bars

Store in an airtight container.  They can also be wrapped individually and stored in the freezer where they will keep for 3 months.

Great for a take-along snack or breakfast.  Pack one in your purse or backpack and it will be thawed by the tine you’re ready to enjoy it.  Have with a glass of low-fat milk for added protein.

Nutrition per bar:

154 calories, 9g fat, 1g saturated fat, 7g protein, 12g carbs, 2g fiber, 62mg sodium

Enjoy!

♥  Terri  ♥

Wake up Sleepyhead ~ Time for Breakfast!

Breakfast, the most important meal of the day!

Yes, we’ve all heard it before.  Everything you read about the morning meal always states this; it has been pounded into our brains over and over again.

But do we all take heed?

I’m sure that most of us do and hopefully what we eat is healthy and hearty enough to get us through the mid-morning slope to lunch.  There are those who think that not eating breakfast will be better for them in helping to lose weight.  There couldn’t be anything further from the truth!

If you are one of those people who choose to neglect eating breakfast, you’re in for a downward spiral every morning because studies have shown that later on in the morning, you’re likely to crave and most likely eat, high glycemic foods throughout the day which will send you on that glycemic rollercoaster and cause you to actually gain weight!

Research has shown that eating foods that are low on the Glycemic Index are better for you because they take longer to digest (therefore prolonging satiety) and they will also maintain blood glucose levels at a relatively constant state. Foods with a high glycemic index not only digest quickly, they can cause your blood sugar levels to drop, which makes you want to consume more high GI foods.

You say you eat breakfast?  What are you having?  A Triple Caramel Cream Espresso Latte with a doughnut or croissant does not constitute breakfast in my book.  Do you have any idea what is in those luxury coffees you get at those chain coffee houses, not to mention that doughnut you’re shoving into your mouth?  Take a gander at this.  According to the nutrition facts on this particular beverage, 44% of its calories comes from FAT! 44%!!!!!!!  And on the GI portion, there’s 52g of sugar.  in addition, the caffeine in the coffee doesn’t help with your blood sugar levels either.  The combination of sugar and caffeine are the two worst things to ingest together.

The effects of combining sugar and caffeine are devastating on the body. The blood glucose levels soar and then crash shortly thereafter, and when combined with caffeine, the enormous surge of energy from the sugar and the stimulant in caffeine lead to a crash of blood sugar within hours. The body then resorts to a vicious cycle of cravings. The swings that the two together cause create a desire for more carbohydrates than are actually needed. Over time, the craving results in an enormous imbalance in blood glucose levels.  As one who has hypoglycemia, I’m well aware of this and have paid dearly for my mistakes on various occasions, although less frequent, if at all nowadays.

So what should you be eating for breakfast?

♣ Unsweetened, natural yogurt mixed with fresh fruit and no-sugar-added muesli

♣ Smoothies made with yogurt, fruits, nuts, tofu or soya milk

♣ Rolled oat porridge cooked with dried fruit, nuts and seeds and sweetened with agave nectar or artificial sweetener, if desired (this was my breakfast today!)

♣ Whole-grain toast lightly buttered with a poached egg, fresh fruit

♣ Omelette stuffed with cooked fresh veggies and low fat cheese

♣ 1/2 of a whole wheat bagel covered with a light coating of low fat cream cheese, smoked salmon, tomato, cucumber, red onion, capers and dill

♣ Whole wheat pita stuffed with scrambled eggs, berries

♣ All-bran muffin with nut butter spread, fresh fruit

♣ Fat-free Greek yogurt with frozen berries, sunflower seeds and nuts, artificial sweetener or agave nectar, if desired

♣ Wholegrain toast with salmon and avocado, fresh fruit

♣ Buckwheat or wholewheat pancakes topped with lightly stewed fruit or unsweetened apple sauce

♣ Wholegrain toast topped with low fat deli ham and low fat cheese, melted, fresh fruit

♣ Rye toast topped with light cream cheese and fruit

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These are a few suggestions.  Can you come up with any other ideas?

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And as a reminder, here’s what you should not eat…

◊ Processed, high GI breakfast cereals, which is pretty much most of them!

◊ White bread, croissants, crumpets and pancakes

◊ Sugar laden jams, spreads and marmalades

◊ Full fat dairy products such as milk, cheese and yogurts

◊ Fat laden meats such as bacon and sausage

◊ Sweetened, processed fruit juices

◊ Sugar added to tea, coffee or on cereals

So start your day with lasting energy!  You’ll feel great, think more clearly and feel fuller longer so you won’t be tempted to grab a doughnut from that box someone brought in to the office and have a piece of chocolate cake from someone’s birthday.

If you do start to feel hungry, then have an apple with some peanut butter or low fat cheese.  If you’re just starting out with a low GI diet or just learning about it, at least try to ensure that you start your day right with a delicious low GI breakfast.

♥  Terri  ♥♥


How do you Like your Eggs in the Morning?

I thought I would give you myself a break from all the ‘bad’ food I’ve been making.  Being one who has low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) I have to have breakfast, and a proper one at that.  I admit I sway from having a proper breakfast on occasion and I do pay for it later on in the day.  I can become irritable, get internal shakes, lose concentration, get a headache, break out into a cold sweat…the list goes on and none of it is pleasant.

I get lazy sometimes and just don’t feel like cutting up veggies or preparing other foods to eat; usually because I’m so busy doing other things and I almost feel like I can’t be bothered to eat, but I know I must.  So what happens?  I eat the wrong things.  I might have a couple of crackers with some butter or peanut butter or perhaps a banana.  I might even grab a slice or two of ham from the fridge or eat a handful of nuts.  Now granted, none of this is absolutely terrible, but it’s not really a proper meal, nor do I eat this all at one time.  It’s usually over a period of about 2-3 hours but it’s still not a good meal.  I’m much better when I have a good breakfast consisting of eggs and veggies and grains or a bowl of porridge with fruit and nuts.  Either of these meals will hold me for a good 3-4 hours, although I will have a mid-morning snack.  There are times when I will even have leftovers from the previous night’s dinner.

I just get tired of having eggs most mornings.

This morning I decided to see what I could find in my GI Recipes book.  Even though this has eggs, it sounded different and tasty.  This would suit Phase 2 on South Beach Diet…

~~SCRAMBLED EGGS w/HONEY-ROASTED TOMATOES~~

Serves 1 (easily increased for any number of servings)

2-3 small tomatoes

1/4 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp honey

1 Tbsp olive oil

salt & freshly ground black pepper

2 eggs

1-2 slices whole grain bread (wholewheat, granary, rye, etc.) (I used a wholewheat bagel)

Preheat oven to 220°C/425°F.

Halve the tomatoes and arrange in a baking dish, cut side up.  Sprinkle over the cinnamon and drizzle with honey.  Season with salt and pepper and roast for 30 minutes.

When the tomatoes are nearly cooked, put the eggs in a bowl, season and beat.  Heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan until sizzling.  Reduce the heat, pour in the eggs and cook gently, stirring constantly until thick and creamy.

Toast the bread and place on plate.  Spoon on the eggs and pile tomatoes on top.  Spoon over any juices from the tomatoes, sprinkle with black pepper and serve.

Enjoy!

♥ Terri  ♥♥

Tea for Me

Tea.  Hot tea.  I hated it when I was younger.  Couldn’t stand the

taste or the smell yet mom would always try to make me drink it when I wasn’t feeling well.  Drinking it would make me feel even worse!  I could drink iced tea with no problem, but keep the hot stuff away from me…yuck.

I did enjoy coffee and started drinking that at a rather early age.  My earliest memory of drinking coffee was around the age of 6 or 7, mainly on Sunday mornings.  When we lived out on Long Island, Dad, my brother and I would hop in the car and drive down to Cream Puff Bakery to get rolls, jelly donuts and crumb buns to have with breakfast and also the Sunday Paper, The NY Daily News.  Mom would stay home to get breakfast cooking and the coffee ready (in our old aluminum percolator) and we’d all sit around the table eating breakfast and reading the papers.  The extent of my reading of the newspaper was the comics.  I highly doubt I’d be reading the business section!

Then when I was in my 20’s, I decided to try herbal teas.  I tolerated them enough to be able to drink them, but I still wasn’t really enjoying tea as much as I enjoyed coffee.  As I got older, I started enjoying them a bit more, but I still wasn’t drinking them as much as the coffee.  Herbal teas are usually drank without milk and I think that was part of the problem of why I wasn’t to crazy about them.

Once I met my British hubby (Chef P), I thought I’d try some English teas, such as Earl Grey.  Wow, what a difference from American teas such as Lipton’s or Tetley’s.  The Earl Grey had a completely different taste and I actually enjoyed it!

The first time I came over here, I met Chef P’s mother.  Once we came into her flat and got through all of the introductions, she asked the standard hospitable thing that every Brit asks their guests when they come in: Would you like a cup of tea?  Now, having just recently started drinking ‘English tea’, instead of just saying ‘Yes, thank you’, I asked her the stupid question of ‘what kind of tea?’  She looked at me, then at P and I realised what I said and wanted to hide.  I don’t think she really knew what to say to me, but in the end, it all worked out and I had a quite enjoyable cup of Assam tea.

As time went on and I eventually moved over here, I started drinking more and more tea.  I now have several different kinds of tea in the house:  English Breakfast {regular & decaf} (my favorite), White Tea, Green Tea Blend, Basic Black Tea {regular & decaf}, Lemon & Ginger, Valerian Tea (helps with sleep) and White Chocolate Tea {a once in a while treat}.  Most of these are tea bags with the exception of the decaf English Breakfast and the White Chocolate, which are loose teas.

I’m currently drinking a cup of White Tea.  I must have milk in my tea, no matter the flavor and honey.  I probably have 3-4 cups of tea and coffee each day, and only one of those cups is caffeine (occasionally I will have a second caffeine in the early afternoon) as I needed to cut down for medical reasons.  And this may sound crazy to some of you caffeine freaks out there, but my first cup of the day, whether it be coffee or tea, is always decaf.  I keep the caffeine hit to my second cup because it’s closer to my breakfast time and caffeine affects my blood sugar if I have it first thing in the morning.

So what’s your favorite hot drink tipple?

♥ Terri  ♥♥

Whole Wheat Pancakes

Breakfast, the most important meal of the day.  Sometimes it’s a struggle trying to decide what I want to should eat.  Usually I’ll make myself a nice warming bowl of porridge or maybe a veggie filled frittata or even a smoothie. However, every now and then, I want something different, something that I really shouldn’t eat, and today was one of those days.

I wanted pancakes.  Proper pancakes.  Not the crepes that they call pancakes here, but proper, fluffy, hearty American pancakes!

Now I had a choice; do I make then with all the ingredients I shouldn’t really have (white flour, butter and sugar) or do I attempt to make them a bit healthy (whole wheat flour, low fat margarine and fruit sugar/fructose)?  I went with the latter.  Do I get a gold star for that?

Pancakes are really easy to make and it’s 99.9% guaranteed that you have these ingredients in your kitchen cupboard at any time.  I mean really now, who doesn’t have eggs, milk, butter, flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in their kitchens??

I’ll give you the white flour recipe and the whole wheat flour recipe…the choice is yours on which ingredients you use, but the method is the same.

The most important thing when making pancakes is that you want your pan to be hot right from the get go.  If the pan isn’t hot enough from the beginning, the batter will stick.  If you have a cast iron fry pan, all the better.

~~AMERICAN PANCAKES~~

Before you even start getting the ingredients together, get that pan on the stove and get it heating up.

(healthy)                                                      (not so healthy)

1 egg                                                            1 egg

3/4 C low-fat milk                                           3/4 C whole milk

2 Tbsp low-fat margarine, melted                    2 Tbsp butter, melted

1 C whole wheat flour                                     1 C white flour

1 Tbsp fructose/fruit sugar                              1 Tbsp sugar

1/2 tsp salt                                                    1/2 tsp salt

1 Tbsp baking powder                                    1 Tbsp baking powder

 

Combine the egg, milk and fat and whisk.  If you have an electric mixer, use that to make it more fluffy.  Mix the dry ingredients together and add to the wet ingredients and blend together.  (I like to mix everything together in a 2-Cup Pyrex measuring jug)

Pour the mixture (or use a ladle) into the HOT dry pan in the size of pancake you wish.  It may be easier to make one at a time unless you plan on making silver-dollar pancakes, then you’ll be able to make 2-3 at a time, depending on the size of your pan.

Leave undisturbed for 1-2 minutes or until you start to see bubbles forming on the surface.  Gently lift the pancake with a metal spatula and flip over.  Again leave for 1-2 minutes or until you see the pancake really starting to fluff up.  Remove to a warm dish and continue with the remaining pancakes.

To the batter you can add sliced fruit such as bananas or strawberries or even blueberries. Or try chopped nuts such as walnuts or pecans or perhaps chocolate chips. (I added walnuts and topped with more walnuts and raisins).

The traditional ‘serve with’ items are butter and maple syrup but that is your choice.  I had mine with a bit of maple syrup only.

 

 

Enjoy!

♥ Terri  ♥♥

Oat, Millet and Nut Bars

A while back, I did a post on Quinoa and thought that I would do another one on a different grain; Millet.

Although millet is most often associated as the main ingredient in bird seed, it is not just “for the birds.” Creamy like mashed potatoes or fluffy like rice, millet is a delicious grain that can accompany many types of food. As with most grains, millet is available in markets throughout the year.

Millet is tiny in size and round in shape and can be white, gray, yellow or red. The most widely available form of millet found in stores is the hulled variety, although traditional couscous made from cracked millet can also be found. The term millet refers to a variety of grains, some of which do not belong to the same genus. – http://www.whfoods.org

I do make millet rather often and usually use it in place of rice or potatoes.  I simply just boil it up for about 30 minutes and add a bit of salt and olive oil or a small bit of butter and eat it that way…but I was looking for something different to do with it.

Rather than make them into a porridge-like breakfast cereal, I was looking to make them into bars, something like a granola bar or a flapjack.  Some recipes I came across used puffed millet.  I inquired about trying to make them puffy at home, but from what I read, that’s nearly impossible as a high pressure system is used which could not be replicated at home.  I also read that eating grains in their ‘puffed’ form reduces their nutrition value and also really isn’t that good for you due to the chemicals used to puff them up.

I did some searching and came across a couple of recipes for millet bars and decided to combine some ingredients from each to make up my own bars.  I will say that most bars of this nature do call for some fat (butter) and sweetener (agave nectar, brown sugar, maple syrup) although it doesn’t appear to be a great deal of either.  I will also say that at the moment I’m typing this, I haven’t yet made the bars, although by the time you get to the bottom of this post, I will have done so.  I started typing this last night, just to get a bit of a head start considering all these words were in my head at the time and didn’t want to lose them, especially since I knew I was about to have either a glass of wine (or two) or a martini!

So until tomorrow….

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Well here we are again (in case you’re wondering…martini) and the millet bars have been made, although they didn’t quite come out as I hoped.  They taste OK, they just didn’t stay together like they should, so they’re in chunks rather than bars.  I’m not sure why that is, perhaps I need to add a bit more liquid stuff or less dry stuff.  (side note:  I’m a day late in posting so these were actually made yesterday – today they’re a bit more set and held together and they taste pretty good!)

If you’d like to try your hand at these, please do.

*For the wheat bran/oat bran/wheat germ, I used a mixture of wheat bran and oat bran.  I didn’t have any wheat germ, but I saw recipes that called for it, so am including it here.  Use any mix of them you wish, or just use one or two of them – the choice is yours!

~~OAT, MILLET AND NUT BARS~~

DRY INGREDIENTS

1 C rolled oats (not instant)

3/4 C millet seeds

1/2 C wheat bran/oat bran/wheat germ*

1 C nuts, chopped (any combo of what you like – I used pecans, walnuts and almonds)

1/2 C seeds (again, any combo – I used sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, linseed/flax and hemp)

WET INGREDIENTS

1/2 C dates, chopped

1 Tbsp butter

2 Tbsp natural peanut butter (no sugar added)

2 Tbsp agave nectar

2 Tbsp maple syrup

2 tsp vanilla

1/4 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 180C/350F.  Grease a 9″ X 13″ baking dish or line with parchment paper and set aside.

Put all the dry ingredients onto a dry baking sheet and stir around with your fingers.  Place in oven and toast for 15 minutes.

While this is in the oven, combine the wet ingredients and the salt in a sauce pan large enough to hold all the nuts/grains. Heat gently and stir until warm and dissolved.  Do not let it boil or it will start to burn. (do as I say, not as I did!)

Remove the nuts/grains from oven and turn temperature down to 150C/300F.  Add the grains to the saucepan and stir to combine.

Pour into prepared baking dish and with wet fingers, press mixture down and flatten.  Be careful as the mixture will be quite warm.  If it’s too hot for you, use a pallet knife dipped in water.

Bake for 25 minutes, remove from oven and allow to cool in the pan.  Cut them when just warm.  When completely cooled, store in a plastic bag or airtight container.

*********

I put the chunks into a plastic bag.  Whatever crumbs I had left, I put into a bowl and added milk.  It makes a nice cereal too!

♥ Terri  ♥♥